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Clé France

The French Property Network

Dec 14

Thank You for your Fab Cle France Network

Hi Sharon,

We are slowly settling in to French life in our fab new French property found via Cle France network and your agent in France could not have been more helpful.

Not only did he show us the property and was happy to take us back for a second viewing, he also has supported us through the whole buying process, being there at the Notaire’s, sorting out the change over of electricity and water, including setting up DDs for us - we couldn’t have done it comparatively stress-free without his help and support. He has even helped us out after we moved in when telephone French and SMEP proved a step too far for me!!

So thank you so much for making it happen for us - buying a property which is so different from what you’re used to is never going to be ‘the dream’ straight away - we are realists! but we are getting closer to it on a daily basis!

Thank you again for your fab network.

Best wishes, Fran and Nigel Bennett.

Psst - Have you seen our new "Meet the Team" page?

Buying a Chateau, Manor House, Farmhouse, Cottage, Holiday Home, Lake or just a Plot of land in France is easy with Cle France, You can do the same, it is easy for you because WE guide YOU through the French Property Buying Process from the very start to completion and beyond!

And as several of our clients say "Follow your heart and make the move"!

Thank You Cle France

For everything you need to know about French property visit www.clefrance.co.uk

Add CommentViews: 4
Dec 14

A Christmas Carol in French

A Christmas Carol En Version Française

There are many famous stories about la période des fêtes (the holiday season). My personal favorite is Un chant de Noël (A Christmas Carol) by Charles Dickens. Although originally in English, Un chant de Noël can help your French!

Cle France Blogs

Charles Dickens: A Christmas Carol, Title page, First edition 1843. Wikimedia Commons.

You will know how it can be useful to watch your favorite TV shows and movies either with les sous-titres français or doublées en français (dubbed in French). While it’s preferable to watch a movie or a TV show en VOST, being familiar with the characters and the story in your first language can help you stay engaged in another language.

The same idea works with les livres (books)!

If you have a favorite book in English, you can usually find it en version française.

Dans l’esprit de Noël (in the Christmas spirit), one such example is Un chant de Noël, a story that has been retold many times and in many different styles. My first memory of the story is la version de Disney (the Disney version) where Balthazar Picsou (Scrooge McDuck) plays the role of Ebenezer Scrooge and Dingo (Goofy) is le fantôme de Jacob Marley (the ghost of Jacob Marley).

The novella is most commonly known as Un chant de Noël in French, but it was also published under the names of Cantique de Noël, Chanson de Noël, and Conte de Noël. No matter the version It’s easy to recognise le thème général (the overarching theme):

Scrooge déteste Noël

« Foutaises ! » 

Bob Cratchit, le pauve employée de Scrooge

Le fantôme de Marley visite Scrooge et lui dit qu’il va être hanté par trois esprits

L’esprit des Noëls passés

L’esprit du Noéls présent

L’esprit des Noëls à venir

Scrooge se reveille, il aime Noël et il veut changer sa vie

Scrooge hates Christmas

“Bah! Humbug!”

Bob Cratchit, Scrooge’s poor employee

The ghost of Marley visits Scrooge and tells him that he will be haunted by three spirits

The Ghost of Christmas Past

The Ghost of Christmas Present

The Ghost of Christmas Future

Scrooge wakes up, he loves Christmas, and he wants to change his life

If you’re looking to practice your French during the holidays, try reading le grand classique (the great classic) in French.

Cle Mortages 

Blog submitted by: Alex at The French Property Network - Cle France.

This blog was originally posted on The French Language Blog pages.

Add CommentViews: 240
Dec 13

A Fabulous Experience with Cle France

Good Afternoon Sharon,

We have had a fabulous experience with Cle France, your estate agent was fabulous and the whole process was surprisingly stress free.

Thank you again to all involved.

Regards, 
Nic McGow

Psst - Have you seen our new "Meet the Team" page?

Buying a Chateau, Manor House, Farmhouse, Cottage, Holiday Home, Lake or just a Plot of land in France is easy with Cle France, You can do the same, it is easy for you because WE guide YOU through the French Property Buying Process from the very start to completion and beyond!

And as several of our clients say "Follow your heart and make the move"!

Thank You Cle France

For everything you need to know about French property visit www.clefrance.co.uk

Add CommentViews: 12
Dec 13

Nice to get a Speedy Reply

Hi Cle France,

Thank you, it’s nice to get a speedy reply for a change,

Dave.

Not the longest client testimonial but I thought an interesting one, we often see criticism of 'French agents" taking a long time to reply to emails or phone calls etc. we see many comments on social media saying this, we at Cle France pride ourselves on a speedy response to emails and phone messages to make sure our clients can organise their ferry crossings or flights etc.

Having said that, UK Office hours are a lot longer than the 'French' working week and some may say if you want to live in France then you may have to get used to having a slower responses and a slower pace of life but then again; that is why many of us want to live there!

Psst - Have you seen our new "Meet the Team" page?

Buying a Chateau, Manor House, Farmhouse, Cottage, Holiday Home, Lake or just a Plot of land in France is easy with Cle France, You can do the same, it is easy for you because WE guide YOU through the French Property Buying Process from the very start to completion and beyond!

And as several of our clients say "Follow your heart and make the move"!

Thank You Cle France

For everything you need to know about French property visit www.clefrance.co.uk

Add CommentViews: 5
Dec 13

Christmas for Père Fouettard

Santa’s Naughty Partner: Come Meet Père Fouettard!

He sees you when you’re sleeping

He knows when you’re awake

He knows if you’ve been bad or good

So be good for goodness sake!

Cle France Blogs

Image courtesy of 'le blog marievie'.

Christmas tomorrow, so that means there are only 24 hours to right your wrongs from the past year to make sure you end up on Santa’s nice list.

In many countries, good little boys and girls wake up to presents under the tree and stockings filled with goodies. The rotten apples get a gift from the man in red, too, but it’s in the form of coal. What are you supposed to do with un morceau de charbon (a lump of coal)? Well, I suppose you could harness its energy  for electricity or apply enough energy to transform it into a diamond, but that’s for another blog.

While coal was on the lips of many American politics this past political season, it certainly was not on any kid’s wish list. And while bad kids in France also receive coal, they have another thing to worry about that anglophone kiddies get to avoid: Père Fouettard (Father Whipper)!

We all know the story of the Christmas patriarch Saint Nicholas, the Bishop of Myra who was the inspiration behind Santa Claus. Nicholas came from a wealthy family and spent much of his life sharing his wealth with those less fortunate than he. Santa is a very nice man to the kids all around the world, but homeboy works alongside Father Whipper, who takes care of the naughty kids.

So what’s this punisher’s story? His first appearance dates back to the 12th century. A local innkeeper (in some variations, he’s a butcher) and his wife capture 3 wealthy children who were on their way to enrol in a religious boarding school. The couple rob the children, murder them, and cook them in a stew. Saint Nick was not happy and showed up at the innkeeper’s door. The innkeeper was transformed into Father Whipper and became an eternal partner with Saint Nick. Personally, I don’t see that as much of a punishment since the innkeeper continues to torture children, but I’m but a mere blogger.

On Saint Nicholas’s Day (le 6 décembre), Père Fouettard travels around and gifts coal and spankings. He’s pretty easy to recognise, too. Our cultures show Santa Claus the same way: a jolly fat man in a red suit with a big white beard. There are different representations of Father Whipper, but he’s easy to spot. Sometimes you’ll see him in dark robes carrying a bag with switches on his back. Other times, he’s wearing teh same suit as Santa, but it’s black. He has a darkened face from all the soot in the chimneys (and alas, sometimes, you’ll still see people playing him in blackface) and his beard is unkempt.

So you better be good whatever you do

cause if you’re bad, I’m warning you

you’ll get nothing* for Christmas

Alors, as-tu été sage cette année ?

So, were you good this year?

* = except coal and whippings

Cle France Savings

Blog submitted by: Alex at The French Property Network - Cle France.

This blog was originally posted on The French Language Blog pages.

Add CommentViews: 178

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